Incredible Care. Incredibly Close.
Questions? Call: (402) 228-3344
Questions? Call:

BCHHC

 
E-mail Form
Email Results

 
 
Print-Friendly
Bookmarks
bookmarks-menu

Phlegmasia cerulea dolens

Deep vein thrombosis - Phlegmasia cerulea dolens; DVT - Phlegmasia cerulea dolens; Phlegmasia alba dolens

Phlegmasia cerulea dolens is an uncommon, severe form of deep venous thrombosis (blood clots in the vein). It most often occurs in the upper leg.

Causes

Phlegmasia cerulea dolens is preceded by a condition called phlegmasia alba dolens. This occurs when the leg is swollen and white due to a clot in a deep vein that blocks blood flow.

Symptoms

Severe pain, rapid swelling, and bluish-skin coloring affect the area below the blocked vein.

Possible Complications

Continued clotting can lead to increased swelling. The swelling can interfere with blood flow. This complication is called phlegmasia alba dolens. It causes the skin to turn white. Phlegmasia alba dolens may lead to tissue death (gangrene) and the need for amputation.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Seek medical help right away if an arm or leg is severely swollen, blue, or painful.

References

Johanning J, Thompson JR, Lynch TG. Clinical evaluation of the venous and lymphatic systems. In: Sidawy AN, Perler BA, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, 2-Volume Set. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2023:chap 20.

Kabrhel C. Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. In: Walls RM, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2023:chap 74.

  • Venous blood clot

    Venous blood clot - illustration

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) affects mainly the veins in the lower leg and the thigh. It involves the formation of a clot (thrombus) in the larger veins of the area.

    Venous blood clot

    illustration

    • Venous blood clot

      Venous blood clot - illustration

      Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) affects mainly the veins in the lower leg and the thigh. It involves the formation of a clot (thrombus) in the larger veins of the area.

      Venous blood clot

      illustration


     

    Review Date: 1/25/2022

    Reviewed By: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
    © 1997- adam.comAll rights reserved.

     
     
     

     

     

    A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.
    Content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.
    © Beatrice Community Hospital & Health Center, . All Rights Reserved.
    This website is for informational purposes only and not intended as medical advice or a substitute for a consultation with a professional health care provider.
    Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Non Discrimination and Language Help