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Live zoster (shingles) vaccine, ZVL - what you need to know

Please note: information for this vaccine can be found here.

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Live zoster (shingles) vaccine, ZVL. www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/shingles.html. Updated October 30, 2019. Accessed November 1, 2019.

  • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm - illustration

    This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern, seen here on the arm, follows a dermatome.

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm

    illustration

  • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest - illustration

    This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome. The linear distribution of the nerve in the skin is very easily seen in this photograph.

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest

    illustration

  • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers - illustration

    This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome.

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers

    illustration

  • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back - illustration

    This photograph shows clusters of blisters (vesicles) and redness (erythema) caused by herpes zoster (shingles). The pattern follows a dermatome. The area may burn or sting before the appearance of these vesicles. Early treatment with an antiviral drug (within 24 hours of the appearance of the vesicles) may prevent progression or reduce the time the infection is active (duration).

    Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back

    illustration

  • Vaccines

    Vaccines - illustration

    Vaccines are used to boost your immune system and prevent many diseases, some of which are serious or life-threatening. Vaccines “teach“ your body how to defend itself when germs, such as viruses or bacteria, invade it. After exposure to the vaccine, your immune system learns to recognize and attack the viruses or bacteria if you are exposed to them later in life. As a result, you will not become ill. Or, if you do get the illness, you will likely have a milder infection. Vaccines are very safe and very effective at protecting against certain serious diseases.

    Vaccines

    illustration

    • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm - illustration

      This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern, seen here on the arm, follows a dermatome.

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm

      illustration

    • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest - illustration

      This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome. The linear distribution of the nerve in the skin is very easily seen in this photograph.

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest

      illustration

    • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers - illustration

      This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome.

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers

      illustration

    • Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back - illustration

      This photograph shows clusters of blisters (vesicles) and redness (erythema) caused by herpes zoster (shingles). The pattern follows a dermatome. The area may burn or sting before the appearance of these vesicles. Early treatment with an antiviral drug (within 24 hours of the appearance of the vesicles) may prevent progression or reduce the time the infection is active (duration).

      Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back

      illustration

    • Vaccines

      Vaccines - illustration

      Vaccines are used to boost your immune system and prevent many diseases, some of which are serious or life-threatening. Vaccines “teach“ your body how to defend itself when germs, such as viruses or bacteria, invade it. After exposure to the vaccine, your immune system learns to recognize and attack the viruses or bacteria if you are exposed to them later in life. As a result, you will not become ill. Or, if you do get the illness, you will likely have a milder infection. Vaccines are very safe and very effective at protecting against certain serious diseases.

      Vaccines

      illustration

    A Closer Look

     

     

    Review Date: 11/1/2019

    Reviewed By: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Editorial update 03/10/2022.

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